Sunday

What You Don't Want to Miss this Christmas

I sit in the semi-darkness of a cloudy December day. The bustle of early morning has passed, and, for a brief interlude, quiet has settled over my home like a warm blanket. I hesitate to turn on the light, afraid the brightness will frighten the silence away. 

Silence is precious in this week before Christmas. 

So is solitude. 

Today I’ll babysit for the littles so their mama can shop unhindered. I’ll make a holiday meal for a friend, wash three loads of laundry, and host the final Bible study of the year. I’ll write in the snatches of time between microwave and dryer beeps and answer a dozen phone calls and emails. 

But in this brief moment before the world elbows its way into my day, I sit in silent contemplation. 

Until someone appears in the doorway of my sanctuary. 

Reverent and respectful of this holy pause, he waits quietly until I notice him. 

Emmanuel. 

God with us. 

God with me. 

Always the perfect gentleman, he doesn’t push himself in. He waits to be invited. To sit with me. To share my contemplation. To speak his heart and listen to mine. He adds some thoughts about my day I haven’t considered, takes a task off my  To Do list, and adds one of his own. 

I tell him about the things that weigh heavy on my heart. Wayward family members, strained relationships, financial challenges, health concerns. 

He takes the burdens from me and hands me peace in exchange. 

As the calendar steamrolls toward Christmas, you may not think you have time for quiet contemplation. Do it anyway. Set aside a few quiet moments to fellowship with Emmanuel, the God who is with us. 

It's what Christmas is all about.



If you enjoyed this post, why not subscribe? I'll send you twice-weekly 5-minute devotions to help nourish your soul. 
Because women need to connect with God in the craziness of life. 

Enter your email address and VALIDATE the Feedburner email sent to your inbox.



Delivered by FeedBurner


Wednesday

Clinging to Faith in the Waiting

Remember  how long it took for Christmas to come when you were a child? 

Beginning with Thanksgiving, the excitement would build. Decorations would appear in stores. Then lights popped up around town, draped in trees like fairy necklaces. Mouth-watering smells wafted out of neighbors’ kitchens. Christmas trees strapped to station wagon roofs rolled by like a parade. 


Dad would finally drag the family tree out of the attic and set it up in the living room. One by one (or sometimes in clumps) packages would appear under the Christmas tree. Stockings dangled from the mantle like limp balloons waiting for the breath of Christmas to fill them. 

It was a horrible marvelous wait, those childhood seasons of Advent. 

And although my childhood Advents were more glittery than the wait the children of Israel experienced, the delays were holy pauses nonetheless. 

My sisters and I hoped for a bicycle, the latest Barbie doll, or a stocking full of candy, but the children of Israel waited for the greatest gift of all – the Messiah. 

And it had been a very long wait. From the dawn of creation, really. 

“And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; he will crush your head, and you will strike his heel,” God had promised in Genesis 3:15. 

The time between the first messianic promise and its fulfillment was centuries long. Years of glory and years of shame. Times of glorious triumph and times of gut-wrenching tragedy. Moments of fearless faith and moments of faithless fear. 

And then the silence. Four hundred years with no word from God. 


No kingly edict. 

No prophetic visions. 

No holy mandates. 

Just silence. 

And waiting. 

And waiting. 

And waiting. 

Unlike my wait between one Christmas and the next, where the memory of the past season birthed hope and expectation for the next, the Israelites had no memories of their own to carry them through. All they had were their forefathers' stories and the ancient promises that, one day, a Messiah would come. 

“For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end” (Is. 9:6-7). 

Yet during that long silence, and that even longer wait between mankind’s fall and Jesus’ incarnation, God was at work. Preparing a place. Preparing a people. Sending the dreaded Romans to conquer most of the known world. Using them to build an infrastructure that would enable early believers to carry the news of the Gospel to the far corners of the globe. 

And then, in the fullness of time, God sent his Son to save the world. 

In the fullness of time. 

I don’t know what you’re waiting for right now. 

A prodigal child to return? 

A dream to be fulfilled? 

A marriage to be healed? 

A loved one to be saved? 

A relationship to be restored? 

A financial burden to be lifted? 

Whatever it is, don’t assume God’s silence means he’s not working. Cling to faith, for "without faith it is impossible to please God, because anyone who comes to him must believe that he exists and that he rewards those who earnestly seek him,” the writer of Hebrews reminds us (11:6). 

On November 22, 2011, I sought God’s face with tears, brokenhearted for a loved one who was far from God. He met me in the pages of his Word and gave me this promise: 

"For I will take you out of the nations; I will gather you from all the countries and bring you back into your own land. I will sprinkle clean water on you, and you will be clean; I will cleanse you from all your impurities and from all your idols. 

“I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my Spirit in you and move you to follow my decrees and be careful to keep my laws. You will live in the land I gave your forefathers; you will be my people, and I will be your God” (Eze. 36:24-28). 



Under this passage in my Bible I wrote my loved one’s name and the date, claiming the promise for them. I clung to these words through years of inky blackness and deafening silence. 

Last month, seven years later, I wrote another note beneath my original one: 

November 22, 2018 ~ God’s promise fulfilled. Great is thy faithfulness. 

You may be in the middle of a long silence, a time when you wonder if God is at work. Don’t stop praying. Continue to search God’s Word for promises and claim them. Enlist prayer warriors to battle with you. 

Never lose hope. Cling to faith, despite what you see. Believe that, in the fullness of time, God will speak life into the silence that fills your ears. He’ll bring to fruition what he promised. 

And when he does, it will be glorious. 

“He who goes out weeping, carrying seed to sow, will return with songs of joy, carrying sheaves with him” (Psalm 126:6). 

What are you waiting for? I’d be honored to pray for you if you leave a comment below. Reading by email? CLICK HERE to visit Hungry for God online and comment there. 


Dear Hungry for God friends,

I suspect there are quite a few busy women on your Christmas list. Friends, co-workers, fellow church members, and your children's teachers, coaches, and babysitters, to name a few.

If you'd like to give them a gift that will draw them closer to the Lord, encourage them to spend time in God's Word, and think biblically, Hungry for God ... Starving for Time, Five-Minute Devotions for Busy Women is the gift you're looking for.

And what about those friends and loved ones who may not have a relationship with the Lord?

In the last devotion in the book, I share, in a winsome and non-threatening way, what it means to have a relationship with Jesus Christ.

If you give someone you care about a copy of HFG, you'll not only be passing along spiritual encouragement, you'll also be sharing the gospel. Either way, you could change someone's life forever.

And that's what Christmas is all about.




I'm excited to say that
Hungry for God . . . Starving for Time has 112 reviews and a 4.8 star rating on Amazon. It received the Christian Small Publisher Book of the Year award in 2016.

If you live in the Columbia, South Carolina area, I'd love to autograph and personalize copies for your special friends. Email me at LoriAHatcher (at) gmail.com.




  





Are you hungry for God, but starving for time? 
I’d love to send you a 5-minute e-mail devotion twice a week to start your day off with the Lord. 

Sign up for a free subscription to Hungry for God by CLICKING HERE.
Then, be sure to VALIDATE the confirmation email you receive. 

Note: I promise never to spam you or share your email address.

Because busy women need to connect with God in the craziness of everyday life.


Sunday

Same Sex Attraction and Marriage Under Grace - A Guest Post By Danielle Powers

Today it's my privilege to welcome Danielle Powers as a guest blogger. Danielle has a compelling story that's timely and inspiring to anyone struggling with same-sex attraction or  knows someone who is. 

Broader than freedom from sexual sin, however, is Danielle's message that God loves us too much to leave us the way we are. Wonder of wonder, he provides a way out. Then he redeems our past and reshapes our future. I know you'll be encouraged by what God has done in Danielle's life.   ~Lori



Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come. (2 Cor. 5:17).

As I lay beside my amazing husband, I marveled at the incredible grace of Our God. “The Lord enables me to love her,” he jokes in a loving way. But there’s truth behind his statement. I’ve put him through a lot in the 15 years of marriage so far. I arrived with a lot of painful baggage from a hidden past. For over a decade this secret chewed at the edges of our marriage. My old-self seemed to overshadow me, and the weight of it crushed my spirit.

Exposure to porn as a young child produced a fascination for the subject. Boys terrified me for the assumption they could get me pregnant, so I focused on inappropriate roll play with friends who were girls. My thoughts became tainted from the natural order of God’s design for sexual intimacy. Inexplicable feelings seduced me, delivering me into same-gender attraction.

At the darkest point of my exploration, the Lord miraculously placed me into a Christian school. As the Living Word took root in my heart, the Holy Spirit convicted me of sin (John 16:8). Realizing my desperate need for a Savior, I surrendered to Christ.

Straight away, a pivotal passage of God’s word struck my core. It was the story in John 8, the woman caught in adultery. Specifically Jesus’ phrase, “Go and sin no more” pierced me with power. I turned away from acting on any homosexual temptation ever again. That’s when the confusing battle with temptation began.

Tumultuous urges conflicted with God’s clear design for sex in creation. Getting to know the Lord, as I silently relied on him as my only solace. I dispelled the lies, filtering them one by one through earnest prayer. I didn’t know much specific Scripture, but I knew God’s character. I didn’t read the Word on my own. Sermons were crucial, spoon-feeding me the word three times a week at school. Truly Jesus carried me. Through it all, God drew me closer, helping me yield to him.

The struggle was real. I didn’t understand the power of Christ within me, feeling I had to ‘fix’ myself. My knee-jerk reaction was to dive into promiscuity with boys. Trying to retrain my desires, I plastered my bedroom walls with male celebrities. I felt I had to prove to the devil I wasn’t gay.

I leaned into the Lord as I pleaded with him to heal me of those temptations. I stuffed those urges down deep. My new heart wanted to please the Lord. Despite the temptations that remained, the Lord freely gave me dynamite self-control. It sounds too simple, but this gift of the Spirit kept me from stumbling.

Self-effort birthed the idea to hide in a monogamous marriage, but my desperate attempts to find the perfect husband failed. Brought to breaking point at the end of high school, I heeded control again to Jesus.

Within a year the Lord brought me a best-friends-first soulmate. We married three years later. But all wasn't perfect. Walls of painful shame barricaded me in secrecy for 13 years of our marriage. I was held captive by the lie that my husband wouldn’t love me if he knew.

I was accustomed to hiding my problem since early childhood, I reasoned, so what did it matter if I concealed something that happened before we met? Yet my past condemned me. I was chained to an image of my “old self,” yet my husband knew the new me.

Over the years the Lord equipped my husband with extreme patience and benevolent love. He fought his own battles, struggling with the subtlety of my emotional disconnect.

In October 2014 the Lord led me from shame toward recovery. He told me to write a book ministering to others about this sensitive issue. This calling forced me to empty out the dregs of my past to my husband.

This is when real healing began. 

While journaling my heart and life story onto paper, the Lord revealed the genesis of my fall. He uncovered everything I’d refused to deal with. I hadn’t fully grasped being “a new creation’ in Christ,” because of the cover of shame. Then he taught me a most encouraging lesson – he would not let my dreadful past go unfruitful.

Praise Jesus, my husband was able to overlook my filthy past. He knew the real me – the new creation in Christ (2 Cor. 5:17).

I finally started to find freedom from the shame of my past, and live under grace. Head knowledge morphed into heart knowledge through much prayer and confession to my husband.

Now mercy is new every day. I get to enjoy this wonderful godly man and our four beautiful children. Only by having Jesus in the center of our marriage were we able to overcome this giant hurdle. The enemy had tried to steal my childhood, kill any hope of a storybook marriage with kids, and destroy any realization of an identity based on Christ. Yet God is greater.

God’s grace is all over our marriage, and Jesus has called me out of the darkness into his glorious light. 

What’s tangible here? 

You Are NOT Your Sin 

Jesus teaches us to love the sinner and hate the sin. Our Lord was not shy to “recline at table” with the lowest of society. He loved them entirely too much to leave them in their broken state (Mark 2:17).

Trust Jesus 

Luke 6:46 says, “Why do you call me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ and do not do what I say?” In the middle of temptation-filled days, I felt I couldn’t tell a soul of my problems. Self-preservation was one reason. Deeper than that, I didn’t trust that anyone would point me the way of Life. My Lord Jesus alone was my counsellor. If you struggle with this sin, seek Jesus first, then seek people who are guided by the truth of God’s Word.

Test Everything by the Word of God 

John 6:36 describes Jesus’ words as Spirit and Life. Our flesh or world-guided ideas count for nothing. Because Jesus is Lord, we trust his definition of sin and allow his word to renew our mind (Rom. 12:2). It’s a lifestyle of taking every thought captive and making it obedient to Christ (2 Cor. 10:5).

Temptation is not a sin. 

Acting on it is. Jesus faced temptation, yet did not sin (Heb. 4:15).

Don’t Trust in Your Own Strength 

Paul expresses in 2 Corinthians 12:9-10 how God’s power is perfected in our weakness. Where our efforts end, the Lord’s power begins. God is Our Deliverer. “Submit yourselves, then, to God. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you” (James 4:7). “You, dear children, are from God and have overcome them, because the one who is in you is greater than the one who is in the world” (1 John 4:4).

Our Affections Are Found in Christ 

Our value is not held in a marital status. Earthly marriage only points toward our Lord who pledged himself to the church, his bride. He sits, alive, waiting for us, his bride, until eternity. I pray encouragement to anyone who suffers with a similar internal battle. Continually hold strong to Jesus for your comfort and hope. He will never let us slip from his loving embrace.

God Bless You,
~Danielle


Danielle Powers is a blogger, blessed wife, and mother of four following God’s call to encourage and help others to see God’s hands in their lives. When not attending to the needs of a busy family, Danielle is the drummer in her church’s Praise and Worship team. She also ministers through a Christian outreach for teen girls aimed at leading hearts toward Christ and transferring life skills. Check out her blog at HolyEverAfter.org, where her love of Christ and thankful heart clearly shines. 



Are you hungry for God, but starving for time? 
I’d love to send you a 5-minute e-mail devotion twice a week to start your day off with the Lord. 

Sign up for a free subscription to Hungry for God by CLICKING HERE.
Then, be sure to VALIDATE the confirmation email you receive. 

Note: I promise never to spam you or share your email address.

Because busy women need to connect with God in the craziness of everyday life.




Wednesday

Without a Heavenly Choir, Can You Sing this Song?



Imagine what it would be like to be a believer during a period when God hadn’t spoken in 400 years. In a country that had always been led first by God’s voice itself and then by prophets and priests who spoke on God’s behalf, this would be disheartening and faith-stretching. This was the setting for the third and final song in our four-part “Songs of Christmas” series. 

In the first post, The Songs of Christmas, we learned how music touches the deepest part of our souls. In Part 2, “What Silence Can Teach Us this Christmas,” we learned from Zechariah how periods of intentional silence can lead us to greater faith and a deeper awareness of what God is doing in the world. In Part 3, "Mary's Song Can Be Our Song Too, we took an up-close look at Mary, the mother of our Lord and learned how her two-part song could be our song, too. 

Today, we’ll look at the final singer in our Christmas choir – one that is, literally, a choir – a choir of angels. Perhaps the most famous of the Christmas story songs, the angels’ song to the shepherds, found in Luke 2:10 – 14, is a song of pure joy. 

Listen, if you don’t already have it memorized: 

Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord. And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger. And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying, Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men. 

Don’t you LOVE those words? Like a celebration after a championship win, they crackle with excitement and triumph: GOOD TIDINGS, GREAT JOY, A SAVIOR, GLORY, PEACE, GOOD WILL! 

Who wouldn’t want to sing a song like that? 

But how did this triumphant, victorious song begin? Do you remember? “Fear not.” As a matter of fact, each of the songs came with a prelude that said, “Fear not.” When the angel spoke to Zechariah, he said, “Fear not.” 

When Gabriel appeared to Mary, he said, “Fear not.” And when the heavenly host split the sky, the first words in their heavenly song was, “Fear not.” 

Why? Because angels are scary? Yes. 

But because life is scary, too. 

If I asked for a show of hands, I bet many of us would confess to being afraid. Afraid of being alone. 

Afraid of bad health or of getting older. 

Afraid there won’t be enough money to pay your bills, send your kids to college, or make it through retirement. 

Afraid of losing a loved one. 

Afraid of cancer, terrorism, or war. 

Afraid that a wayward child might never return. 

Afraid for the future of our country, our children, and our grandchildren. 

Afraid of dying. 

We live in a scary world. But the angels’ message 2,000 years ago wasn’t just for the shepherds, it was for all people: “Unto you is born this day in the city of David, a Savior!” And this Savior came with a promise: 

We find it in Isaiah 43:1-3:

But now, this is what the LORD says -- "Fear not, for I have redeemed you; I have summoned you by name; you are mine. When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and when you pass through the rivers, they will not sweep over you. When you walk through the fire, you will not be burned; the flames will not set you ablaze. For I am the LORD, your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Savior; 

Every day we cross paths with people who are afraid. Many don’t know the Prince of Peace. 

They don’t have the confidence that comes from knowing the God who holds our lives in his hands. 

They don’t know the Savior who promises never to forsake us, to walk beside us all of our days, and to one day take us to heaven to live with him forever. 

And if they do know him, sometimes they need to be reminded that the same God who saved them can also keep them. This is where our song can make a difference. 

And when they had seen him, they made widely known the saying which was told them concerning this child. And all those who heard it marveled at those things which were told them by the shepherds (Luke 2:17). 


The shepherds’ assignment is our assignment, too. Go and tell. 

“Then the shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things that they had heard and seen,” As we glorify and praise God and tell all the things we have heard and seen to those around us, their song becomes ours, and the gift goes on. 

This Christmas, I hope you’ll touch the deepest part of people’s hearts and share the joy of song with others. The song of belief, that comes out of intentional silence, like Zechariah. The song that tells of what God is did for us and is doing through us, like Mary. And the song of joy that announces that the Savior of the world has come, like the angels and shepherds. 

“FEAR NOT,” we join them in singing, “for behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which will be to all people. For unto you is born this day, a Savior, which is Christ the Lord.” 

 Now it’s your turn. If you’ve followed the series all the way through, which has been your favorite song? Which do you plan to sing this Christmas season? Leave a comment below and share your thoughts. If you’re reading by email, click HERE to visit Hungry for God online and leave a comment.


 Dear Hungry for God friends,

I suspect there are quite a few busy women on your Christmas list. Friends, co-workers, fellow church members, and your children's teachers, coaches, and babysitters, to name a few.

If you'd like to give them a gift that will draw them closer to the Lord, encourage them to spend time in God's Word, and think biblically, Hungry for God ... Starving for Time, Five-Minute Devotions for Busy Women is the gift you're looking for.

And what about those friends and loved ones who may not have a relationship with the Lord?

In the last devotion in the book, I share, in a winsome and non-threatening way, what it means to have a relationship with Jesus Christ.

If you give someone you care about a copy of HFG, you'll not only be passing along spiritual encouragement, you'll also be sharing the gospel. Either way, you could change someone's life forever.

And that's what Christmas is all about.




I'm excited to say that
Hungry for God . . . Starving for Time has 112 reviews and a 4.8 star rating on Amazon. It received the Christian Small Publisher Book of the Year award in 2016.

If you live in the Columbia, South Carolina area, I'd love to autograph and personalize copies for your special friends. Email me at LoriAHatcher (at) gmail.com.




  



Are you hungry for God, but starving for time? 
I’d love to send you a 5-minute e-mail devotion twice a week to start your day off with the Lord. 

Sign up for a free subscription to Hungry for God by CLICKING HERE.
Then, be sure to VALIDATE the confirmation email you receive. 

Note: I promise never to spam you or share your email address.

Because busy women need to connect with God in the craziness of everyday life.

Sunday

How Mary's Song Can Be Our Song, Too

When I first heard four-year-old Claire Ryann sing, she and her dad were slouched on a couch belting out a duet of the Toy Story song,"You've Got a Friend in Me." I became a fan, however, when I discovered her hauntingly-beautiful YouTube video of the song, "Gethsemane."

In “The Songs of Christmas,” the first post in our holiday series, we learned how music touches the deepest part of our souls. In Part 2, “What Silence Can Teach Us this Christmas,” we learned from Zechariah the priest how periods of intentional silence and seeking God can lead us to greater faith and a deeper awareness of what God is doing in the world. 


Today, we’ll take an up-close look at Mary, the mother of our Lord. Probably a decade or so older than Claire Ryann, Mary was, nonetheless, a young woman. A very important young woman who sang a two-part song that  can be our song, too.

We read about Mary, the second singer in our Christmas choir, in Luke 1. Like Zechariah,  Mary asked the same question of the angel when he revealed the shocking news that she had been chosen to carry the Messiah, the Christ child – "How can this be?" 

 Zechariah asked, “How can this be? My wife is so old.” Mary basically asked, “How can this be? I’m too young. I haven’t yet married or known a man intimately.” 

The angel, Gabriel, answered her curiosity by sharing a bit of information no one else knew in Nazareth: “Elizabeth, your relative has also conceived a son in her old age; and this is now the sixth month for her who was called barren. For with God nothing will be impossible” (v.36). 

Mary knew full well the stigma that had plagued her poor relative Elizabeth – the tragedy no woman wanted – to be unable to bear a child. When she heard that God had done the impossible in Elizabeth’s life, she believed he could do the impossible in hers, too. “Behold the maidservant of the Lord," she declared, "Let it be to me according to your word” (v. 38).

 And we know the rest of the story: Mary immediately went to visit Elizabeth, where the Lord confirmed to Mary yet again that she was carrying the Messiah (v. 41-45). Mary’s song, the response that bursts forth from an overflow of her heart, became the passage we know as The Magnificat. 

Notice the two distinct parts of Mary’s song:

In verses 46-49, she speaks of what God has done in her (personally). 

My soul glorifies the Lord and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, 

for he has been mindful of the humble state of his servant. 

From now on all generations will call me blessed, 

for the Mighty One has done great things for me-- holy is his name. 

In verses 50-55, she speaks of how God has fulfilled his promise and what he plans to do through her to save the world. 

His mercy extends to those who fear him, from generation to generation. 

He has performed mighty deeds with his arm; 

he has scattered those who are proud in their inmost thoughts. 

He has brought down rulers from their thrones but has lifted up the humble. 

He has filled the hungry with good things but has sent the rich away empty. 

He has helped his servant Israel, remembering to be merciful to Abraham and his descendants forever, even as he said to our fathers. 

Mary’s song is a song we, too, should sing this Christmas. And our song can also have two parts. 

In the first part of our song, we can share with others what God has done IN us by sending Christ to save us from our sins. 

In the second part of our song, we can share with others what God wants to do through us by sharing the gospel with others. 


If Claire Ryann, a four-year-old little girl, and Mary, a frightened, bewildered, pregnant-out-of-wedlock teenager can testify for God, then we can, too

This Christmas season, I invite you to ask God for one person with whom you can share what God has done in your life because of Jesus. Just one. And then watch for the opportunity and be ready. 

Because it WILL come. 

In the final post of this series, we’ll look at the final singer in our Christmas choir, which isn’t really a singer, but a bunch of singers . . . Can you guest who it might be? Don’t miss it! 

Now it’s your turn. Who do you feel the Lord laying on your heart this Christmas season that needs to hear the Gospel? If you’ll leave their first name in the comments below, I’ll join you in prayer, asking God to give you the opportunity to share Jesus with them.

And then, click to enjoy Claire Ryann's version of Silent Night. Merry Christmas!

If you're reading by email, click HERE to hear Claire Ryann sing Silent Night.



 Dear Hungry for God friends,

I suspect there are quite a few busy women on your Christmas list. Friends, co-workers, fellow church members, and your children's teachers, coaches, and babysitters, to name a few.

If you'd like to give them a gift that will draw them closer to the Lord, encourage them to spend time in God's Word, and think biblically, Hungry for God ... Starving for Time, Five-Minute Devotions for Busy Women is the gift you're looking for.

And what about those friends and loved ones who may not have a relationship with the Lord?

In the last devotion in the book, I share, in a winsome and non-threatening way, what it means to have a relationship with Jesus Christ.

If you give someone you care about a copy of HFG, you'll not only be passing along spiritual encouragement, you'll also be sharing the gospel. Either way, you could change someone's life forever.

And that's what Christmas is all about.




I'm excited to say that
Hungry for God . . . Starving for Time has 112 reviews and a 4.8 star rating on Amazon. It received the Christian Small Publisher Book of the Year award in 2016.

If you live in the Columbia, South Carolina area, I'd love to autograph and personalize copies for your special friends. Email me at LoriAHatcher (at) gmail.com.




 



Are you hungry for God, but starving for time? 
I’d love to send you a 5-minute e-mail devotion twice a week to start your day off with the Lord. 

Sign up for a free subscription to Hungry for God by CLICKING HERE.
Then, be sure to VALIDATE the confirmation email you receive. 

Note: I promise never to spam you or share your email address.

Because busy women need to connect with God in the craziness of everyday life.