Wednesday

Without a Heavenly Choir, Can You Sing this Song?



Imagine what it would be like to be a believer during a period when God hadn’t spoken in 400 years. In a country that had always been led first by God’s voice itself and then by prophets and priests who spoke on God’s behalf, this would be disheartening and faith-stretching. This was the setting for the third and final song in our four-part “Songs of Christmas” series. 

In the first post, The Songs of Christmas, we learned how music touches the deepest part of our souls. In Part 2, “What Silence Can Teach Us this Christmas,” we learned from Zechariah how periods of intentional silence can lead us to greater faith and a deeper awareness of what God is doing in the world. In Part 3, "Mary's Song Can Be Our Song Too, we took an up-close look at Mary, the mother of our Lord and learned how her two-part song could be our song, too. 

Today, we’ll look at the final singer in our Christmas choir – one that is, literally, a choir – a choir of angels. Perhaps the most famous of the Christmas story songs, the angels’ song to the shepherds, found in Luke 2:10 – 14, is a song of pure joy. 

Listen, if you don’t already have it memorized: 

Fear not: for, behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord. And this shall be a sign unto you; Ye shall find the babe wrapped in swaddling clothes, lying in a manger. And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying, Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men. 

Don’t you LOVE those words? Like a celebration after a championship win, they crackle with excitement and triumph: GOOD TIDINGS, GREAT JOY, A SAVIOR, GLORY, PEACE, GOOD WILL! 

Who wouldn’t want to sing a song like that? 

But how did this triumphant, victorious song begin? Do you remember? “Fear not.” As a matter of fact, each of the songs came with a prelude that said, “Fear not.” When the angel spoke to Zechariah, he said, “Fear not.” 

When Gabriel appeared to Mary, he said, “Fear not.” And when the heavenly host split the sky, the first words in their heavenly song was, “Fear not.” 

Why? Because angels are scary? Yes. 

But because life is scary, too. 

If I asked for a show of hands, I bet many of us would confess to being afraid. Afraid of being alone. 

Afraid of bad health or of getting older. 

Afraid there won’t be enough money to pay your bills, send your kids to college, or make it through retirement. 

Afraid of losing a loved one. 

Afraid of cancer, terrorism, or war. 

Afraid that a wayward child might never return. 

Afraid for the future of our country, our children, and our grandchildren. 

Afraid of dying. 

We live in a scary world. But the angels’ message 2,000 years ago wasn’t just for the shepherds, it was for all people: “Unto you is born this day in the city of David, a Savior!” And this Savior came with a promise: 

We find it in Isaiah 43:1-3:

But now, this is what the LORD says -- "Fear not, for I have redeemed you; I have summoned you by name; you are mine. When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and when you pass through the rivers, they will not sweep over you. When you walk through the fire, you will not be burned; the flames will not set you ablaze. For I am the LORD, your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Savior; 

Every day we cross paths with people who are afraid. Many don’t know the Prince of Peace. 

They don’t have the confidence that comes from knowing the God who holds our lives in his hands. 

They don’t know the Savior who promises never to forsake us, to walk beside us all of our days, and to one day take us to heaven to live with him forever. 

And if they do know him, sometimes they need to be reminded that the same God who saved them can also keep them. This is where our song can make a difference. 

And when they had seen him, they made widely known the saying which was told them concerning this child. And all those who heard it marveled at those things which were told them by the shepherds (Luke 2:17). 


The shepherds’ assignment is our assignment, too. Go and tell. 

“Then the shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things that they had heard and seen,” As we glorify and praise God and tell all the things we have heard and seen to those around us, their song becomes ours, and the gift goes on. 

This Christmas, I hope you’ll touch the deepest part of people’s hearts and share the joy of song with others. The song of belief, that comes out of intentional silence, like Zechariah. The song that tells of what God is did for us and is doing through us, like Mary. And the song of joy that announces that the Savior of the world has come, like the angels and shepherds. 

“FEAR NOT,” we join them in singing, “for behold, I bring you good tidings of great joy, which will be to all people. For unto you is born this day, a Savior, which is Christ the Lord.” 

 Now it’s your turn. If you’ve followed the series all the way through, which has been your favorite song? Which do you plan to sing this Christmas season? Leave a comment below and share your thoughts. If you’re reading by email, click HERE to visit Hungry for God online and leave a comment.


 Dear Hungry for God friends,

I suspect there are quite a few busy women on your Christmas list. Friends, co-workers, fellow church members, and your children's teachers, coaches, and babysitters, to name a few.

If you'd like to give them a gift that will draw them closer to the Lord, encourage them to spend time in God's Word, and think biblically, Hungry for God ... Starving for Time, Five-Minute Devotions for Busy Women is the gift you're looking for.

And what about those friends and loved ones who may not have a relationship with the Lord?

In the last devotion in the book, I share, in a winsome and non-threatening way, what it means to have a relationship with Jesus Christ.

If you give someone you care about a copy of HFG, you'll not only be passing along spiritual encouragement, you'll also be sharing the gospel. Either way, you could change someone's life forever.

And that's what Christmas is all about.




I'm excited to say that
Hungry for God . . . Starving for Time has 112 reviews and a 4.8 star rating on Amazon. It received the Christian Small Publisher Book of the Year award in 2016.

If you live in the Columbia, South Carolina area, I'd love to autograph and personalize copies for your special friends. Email me at LoriAHatcher (at) gmail.com.




  



Are you hungry for God, but starving for time? 
I’d love to send you a 5-minute e-mail devotion twice a week to start your day off with the Lord. 

Sign up for a free subscription to Hungry for God by CLICKING HERE.
Then, be sure to VALIDATE the confirmation email you receive. 

Note: I promise never to spam you or share your email address.

Because busy women need to connect with God in the craziness of everyday life.

Sunday

How Mary's Song Can Be Our Song, Too

When I first heard four-year-old Claire Ryann sing, she and her dad were slouched on a couch belting out a duet of the Toy Story song,"You've Got a Friend in Me." I became a fan, however, when I discovered her hauntingly-beautiful YouTube video of the song, "Gethsemane."

In “The Songs of Christmas,” the first post in our holiday series, we learned how music touches the deepest part of our souls. In Part 2, “What Silence Can Teach Us this Christmas,” we learned from Zechariah the priest how periods of intentional silence and seeking God can lead us to greater faith and a deeper awareness of what God is doing in the world. 


Today, we’ll take an up-close look at Mary, the mother of our Lord. Probably a decade or so older than Claire Ryann, Mary was, nonetheless, a young woman. A very important young woman who sang a two-part song that  can be our song, too.

We read about Mary, the second singer in our Christmas choir, in Luke 1. Like Zechariah,  Mary asked the same question of the angel when he revealed the shocking news that she had been chosen to carry the Messiah, the Christ child – "How can this be?" 

 Zechariah asked, “How can this be? My wife is so old.” Mary basically asked, “How can this be? I’m too young. I haven’t yet married or known a man intimately.” 

The angel, Gabriel, answered her curiosity by sharing a bit of information no one else knew in Nazareth: “Elizabeth, your relative has also conceived a son in her old age; and this is now the sixth month for her who was called barren. For with God nothing will be impossible” (v.36). 

Mary knew full well the stigma that had plagued her poor relative Elizabeth – the tragedy no woman wanted – to be unable to bear a child. When she heard that God had done the impossible in Elizabeth’s life, she believed he could do the impossible in hers, too. “Behold the maidservant of the Lord," she declared, "Let it be to me according to your word” (v. 38).

 And we know the rest of the story: Mary immediately went to visit Elizabeth, where the Lord confirmed to Mary yet again that she was carrying the Messiah (v. 41-45). Mary’s song, the response that bursts forth from an overflow of her heart, became the passage we know as The Magnificat. 

Notice the two distinct parts of Mary’s song:

In verses 46-49, she speaks of what God has done in her (personally). 

My soul glorifies the Lord and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior, 

for he has been mindful of the humble state of his servant. 

From now on all generations will call me blessed, 

for the Mighty One has done great things for me-- holy is his name. 

In verses 50-55, she speaks of how God has fulfilled his promise and what he plans to do through her to save the world. 

His mercy extends to those who fear him, from generation to generation. 

He has performed mighty deeds with his arm; 

he has scattered those who are proud in their inmost thoughts. 

He has brought down rulers from their thrones but has lifted up the humble. 

He has filled the hungry with good things but has sent the rich away empty. 

He has helped his servant Israel, remembering to be merciful to Abraham and his descendants forever, even as he said to our fathers. 

Mary’s song is a song we, too, should sing this Christmas. And our song can also have two parts. 

In the first part of our song, we can share with others what God has done IN us by sending Christ to save us from our sins. 

In the second part of our song, we can share with others what God wants to do through us by sharing the gospel with others. 


If Claire Ryann, a four-year-old little girl, and Mary, a frightened, bewildered, pregnant-out-of-wedlock teenager can testify for God, then we can, too

This Christmas season, I invite you to ask God for one person with whom you can share what God has done in your life because of Jesus. Just one. And then watch for the opportunity and be ready. 

Because it WILL come. 

In the final post of this series, we’ll look at the final singer in our Christmas choir, which isn’t really a singer, but a bunch of singers . . . Can you guest who it might be? Don’t miss it! 

Now it’s your turn. Who do you feel the Lord laying on your heart this Christmas season that needs to hear the Gospel? If you’ll leave their first name in the comments below, I’ll join you in prayer, asking God to give you the opportunity to share Jesus with them.

And then, click to enjoy Claire Ryann's version of Silent Night. Merry Christmas!

If you're reading by email, click HERE to hear Claire Ryann sing Silent Night.



 Dear Hungry for God friends,

I suspect there are quite a few busy women on your Christmas list. Friends, co-workers, fellow church members, and your children's teachers, coaches, and babysitters, to name a few.

If you'd like to give them a gift that will draw them closer to the Lord, encourage them to spend time in God's Word, and think biblically, Hungry for God ... Starving for Time, Five-Minute Devotions for Busy Women is the gift you're looking for.

And what about those friends and loved ones who may not have a relationship with the Lord?

In the last devotion in the book, I share, in a winsome and non-threatening way, what it means to have a relationship with Jesus Christ.

If you give someone you care about a copy of HFG, you'll not only be passing along spiritual encouragement, you'll also be sharing the gospel. Either way, you could change someone's life forever.

And that's what Christmas is all about.




I'm excited to say that
Hungry for God . . . Starving for Time has 112 reviews and a 4.8 star rating on Amazon. It received the Christian Small Publisher Book of the Year award in 2016.

If you live in the Columbia, South Carolina area, I'd love to autograph and personalize copies for your special friends. Email me at LoriAHatcher (at) gmail.com.




 



Are you hungry for God, but starving for time? 
I’d love to send you a 5-minute e-mail devotion twice a week to start your day off with the Lord. 

Sign up for a free subscription to Hungry for God by CLICKING HERE.
Then, be sure to VALIDATE the confirmation email you receive. 

Note: I promise never to spam you or share your email address.

Because busy women need to connect with God in the craziness of everyday life.




Wednesday

What Silence Can Teach Us this Christmas - The Songs of Christmas, Part 2

As I said in my previous post, "The Songs of Christmas," music touches the deepest part of  our souls. As we begin the holiday season, let's look at three key "singers" in the Christmas story, all found in the Gospel of Luke. 

Why focus on Luke?

“Luke is unique in the manner of writing he brings to the Christmas story," Magrey deVega writes in his book, Awaiting the Already. Mark wrote with an ominous tone. John wrote with poetic flourish. But Luke wrote with a song in his head. There’s no other way to explain why nearly every major character in Luke’s Nativity story breaks out into a song at some point. 

“Luke is a lot like a Rogers and Hammerstein musical: Something happens to someone, and they sing about it. So if Mark is like a Reader’s Digest, Matthew is like a Steven King novel, and John is like a Shakespeare play, then Luke is like a Broadway musical. 

"Every time something great happens to someone, they break out into song.” 

Consider Mary’s Magnificat, or Zechariah’s prophecy, or Elizabeth’s song in seclusion. Luke really loves his songs. 

And come to think of it, isn’t this true of all of us? 

In the next few blog posts, I'd like us to look at three of the “carols,” the songs we read about in the Gospel of Luke. Not just to learn more about the songs, but in hopes that we, too, can sing them.

Before we jump in, a nod to the serious Bible students out among us. You’ll notice that although the Bible tells us the people “said” these things, the poetic nature of their expression and speech is more consistent with song, like what we find in the Psalms. Often, those songs emerge from a person’s deep well of emotion, accompanied by great joy and awe bordering on fear. 

Today, let's look at Zechariahs’ song. 

Zechariah is the first singer in our Christmas choir in Luke 1:5-25. Zechariah (a priest) and his wife, Elisabeth, were elderly. Long past the age of childbearing, Elizabeth had been barren all her life.

Not surprising, when an angel visited Zechariah while he was ministering in the temple, he didn't believe what the angel said.

"Do not be afraid, Zechariah; your prayer has been heard. Your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you are to give him the name John. He will be a joy and delight to you, and many will rejoice because of his birth” (v. 13-14).

I can almost hear Zechariah snort.

Don't you know how old my wife is? And how long we've prayed for a child? Have you any idea what a miracle that would be?


Scholars believe the angel made Zechariah deaf as well as mute in response to his disbelief (see vs. 62). This silence was a gift – a gift that produced the faith and understanding he didn’t have when he doubted God’s revelation to him in the temple. In the quiet of those nine months, he pondered, studied, and sought God’s face. What he learned moved him from doubt to declaration, confusion to clarity, and fear to faith.

Out of this holy pause came Zechariah’s song of prophecy and praise

Praise be to the Lord, the God of Israel,

because he has come and has redeemed his people.

He has raised up a horn of salvation for us in the house of his servant David (as he said through his holy prophets of long ago,

salvation from our enemies and from the hand of all who hate us--

 to show mercy to our fathers and to remember his holy covenant,

the oath he swore to our father Abraham:

to rescue us from the hand of our enemies, and to enable us to serve him without fear
 in holiness and righteousness before him all our days.

And you, my child, will be called a prophet of the Most High; for you will go on before the Lord to prepare the way for him,

to give his people the knowledge of salvation through the forgiveness of their sins,

because of the tender mercy of our God, by which the rising sun will come to us from heaven


to shine on those living in darkness and in the shadow of death, to guide our feet into the path of peace" (v. 67-79).


This Christmas season, I invite you to consider that perhaps God is calling you to intentional silence. Not a total cessation of speech and hearing, probably, but some deliberate times of coming into his presence.

Perhaps, each Sunday between now and Christmas, spend half an hour or an hour,reading his word, and meditating – thinking deeply on what you read.

Ask God to reveal himself to you and listen for him to speak, both through his Word and through the still, small voice in your heart. It’s important to come with an open heart.

Unlike Zechariah’s first response, come willing to believe the promises God gives you. Perhaps you, too, will leave these encounters with a greater understanding of the majesty of God and his plan for the world. 


In my next blog post, “How Mary’s Song Can Become Yours This Christmas,” we’ll spend some time with Mary, the mother of our Lord, and discover something you may never have seen before in her part of the Christmas story. I can’t wait for us to sing her song together.

And if you missed Part 1, "The Songs of Christmas," CLICK HERE.


Dear Hungry for God friends,

I suspect there are quite a few busy women on your Christmas list. Friends, co-workers, fellow church members, and your children's teachers, coaches, and babysitters, to name a few.

If you'd like to give them a gift that will draw them closer to the Lord, encourage them to spend time in God's Word, and think biblically, Hungry for God ... Starving for Time, Five-Minute Devotions for Busy Women is the gift you're looking for.

And what about those friends and loved ones who may not have a relationship with the Lord?

In the last devotion in the book, I share, in a winsome and non-threatening way, what it means to have a relationship with Jesus Christ.

If you give someone you care about a copy of HFG, you'll not only be passing along spiritual encouragement, you'll also be sharing the gospel. Either way, you could change someone's life forever.

And that's what Christmas is all about.




I'm excited to say that
Hungry for God . . . Starving for Time has 112 reviews and a 4.8 star rating on Amazon. It received the Christian Small Publisher Book of the Year award in 2016.

If you live in the Columbia, South Carolina area, I'd love to autograph and personalize copies for your special friends. Email me at LoriAHatcher (at) gmail.com.





  




Are you hungry for God, but starving for time? 
I’d love to send you a 5-minute e-mail devotion twice a week to start your day off with the Lord. 

Sign up for a free subscription to Hungry for God by CLICKING HERE.
Then, be sure to VALIDATE the confirmation email you receive. 

Note: I promise never to spam you or share your email address.

Because busy women need to connect with God in the craziness of everyday life.




Monday

#RocksCryOut -- A Movement Is Born

Our Thanksgiving gathering wasn’t our typical holiday celebration. It started out routine enough – my brother-in-law’s deep-fried turkey, several cheese-filled casseroles, and dessert – lots and lots of dessert. 

But then, after we’d cleaned up the kitchen and sent the men into the living room to watch the Cowboys beat the Redskins, my friends and I (including my mom, who’s one of my best friends) spread newspaper on the table and began the funnest project I’ve ever done. We painted #RocksCryOut rocks.








Each woman chose several smooth stones, picked her favorite color paint, and went to work. Hadassah and I picked sparkly lavender, because, well, it’s the prettiest color of them all. Has been since my chubby, 2-year-old fingers could hold a crayon. Sue chose an electric orange, although she swore she wasn’t a Clemson Tiger fan. Karen chose Kermit the Frog green, and Mom picked pearly pink. 






After we covered the river rocks with paint and waited for them to dry, we used Sharpie markers to write short, inspiring Bible verses on them. 


Here are some of our favorites: 

“I have loved you with an everlasting love” (Jer. 31:3).

 “We love because he first loved us” (1 John 4:19). 

“Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good” (Ps. 136:1). 

“Let everything that has breath praise the Lord” (Psalm 150:6). 

“Do to others as you would have them do to you” (Luke 6:31). 

“When I am afraid, I will trust in you” (Ps. 56:3). 

“We love because he first loved us” (John 4:19). 

“Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and you will be saved” (Acts 16:31). 

“In him was life” (John 1:4). 


Then we added the hashtag #RocksCryOut to the back and sprayed them with a shiny acrylic coating to seal the colors and protect them from the elements. 

Each woman left with her painted rocks and a mission – to place them where others would find them – along walkways, near the entrances to public buildings, shopping centers, and businesses. Even my husband got in on the fun by offering to place several along the disc golf course he frequents. 


The #RocksCryOut Launch Team
(L-R) Mom, me, Sue, Hadassah, and Karen
It wasn’t just a fun craft. Our afternoon activity was the official launch of the #RocksCryOut movement. 

Based on the belief that God’s Word never returns void, but always accomplishes what it’s set out to do (Isa. 55:11), our mission is to scatter colorful, painted rocks with Scripture verses on them wherever we go. 



I’m asking God to bring each rock to the attention of a person who needs the encouragement of God’s Word – a divine rock encounter, if you will. 

Would you like to be part of the movement?


It’s simple and inexpensive. All you need are smooth stones (I bought a giant back of rocks from a home improvement store for less than $5), acrylic paint (50% off at Hobby Lobby), Sharpie markers, and a can of acrylic sealer (I used my 40% off coupon, but hairspray would probably work just as well). The supplies cost me less than $20. 

Google “short Bible verses” and make a list of the ones you like best or use the ones I’ve shared above, then gather a few friends, a Sunday school class (kids LOVE this), AWANA group, or ladies ministry, and go to work. 









If you’ll be spending time with friends and family over the holidays (babysitting grandkids?), gather everything you need in advance and invite them to paint with you. As you paint each rock, pray for the person who will find it. Ask God to use the verse you’ve chosen to speak truth to their heart and reveal himself to them. 




Remember, you don’t have to be an artist to paint a #RocksCryOut rock. The goal isn’t to create a beautiful rock (although they are pretty). The goal is to share the beauty of God’s Word. 

An assortment of delicious desserts and coffee made our afternoon even sweeter, but isn’t required (smile). 


I left this rock by the sidewalk near our church.
When your rocks are dry, place them on public property where they can easily be seen, then take a photo of them. Remember, unlike an Easter egg hunt, your goal isn’t to hide them, but to place them where people can easily find them. 

Then share your photo on social media with the hashtag #RocksCryOut. Link back to this post so others can catch a vision and join the movement. And if you’ll send me a photo of your painting party and/or your rocks and tell me where you placed them, I’d love to include it on my Hungry for God #RocksCryOut page and blog. Email them to me at LoriAHatcher (at) gmail.com. 

I can’t wait to see what God is going to do in people’s lives as we share his Word this way. May God richly bless your efforts to shine the light of Jesus wherever you go! 

"I tell you," (Jesus) replied, "if they keep quiet, the rocks will cry out" (Luke 19:40). 


If you'd like to read more about the inspiration behind #RocksCryOut, click HERE.


Are you hungry for God, but starving for time? 
I’d love to send you a 5-minute e-mail devotion twice a week to start your day off with the Lord. 

Sign up for a free subscription to Hungry for God by CLICKING HERE.
Then, be sure to VALIDATE the confirmation email you receive. 

Note: I promise never to spam you or share your email address.

Because busy women need to connect with God in the craziness of everyday life.




Sunday

The Songs of Christmas and an Invitation

Some of the greatest joy in my life comes from my grandchildren. If you've been reading for very long, you know I have three: Lauren, 5, Caroline, 3, and Andrew (aka Bubby) who’s 1. 

We had the pleasure of caring for Andrew for five days recently while the rest of his family went to Disney World. 

As familiar as he is with us, we knew he might have a hard time. Not just because he’d be missing his Mommy, or his Mommy and his Daddy, but he’d be missing his mommy, his daddy, his sisters, and his house. Not to mention nursing, because he wasn’t quite weaned yet. 


Thankfully, he went down easily that first night. The little fella was worn out from keeping up with Papa and Gigi all day. But around midnight I heard him cry. Now I know enough not to rush in there, because oftentimes babies will soothe themselves back to sleep, but that’s not what happened this night. 

His whimper became a cry. 

His cry became a shriek, which eventually became an all-out wail. 

I rushed into his room, scooped him up from his Pack-and-Play and began to soothe him. 

He cried louder. 

I rocked him faster. 

He continued to cry. 

I patted. 

I jiggled. 

I bounced. 

And then I remembered something my daughter had said. “When I put him to sleep, sometimes I rock him and sing.” 

And so I began to sing, so softly I wondered if he could hear me over his cries. 

Jesus loves me this I know. For the Bible tells me so. Little ones to him belong. They are weak, but he is strong. 

His cries grew softer. 

And softer. 

And softer.

Until the only sound I heard was the snuffle of his peaceful breathing. 

It's true - music touches the deepest part of our hearts. 

I watched the powerful effect of music in my grandmother’s nursing home room one Christmas season. 

My granny was suffering from dementia. Although I visited every week, it had been almost a year since she had spoken to me. She didn’t know my name, or hers for that matter. She didn’t make eye contact, and she certainly couldn’t carry on a conversation. 

That Christmas, knowing it was probably the last Christmas we’d spend with her, our family gathered around her bedside. We’d brought a tiny Christmas tree and decorated it with twinkling lights, but she was oblivious to her surroundings. We tried telling her about what we were planning to eat for Christmas dinner, what gifts we’d bought for the children. We held her hand and stroked her soft grey hair. 

Still no response. 

“What’s your granny’s favorite Christmas carol?” my husband asked. 

“Silent Night,” I responded. 

So he began to sing. “Silent night, holy night, all is calm, all is bright.” 

One by one we all joined in. 

So many conflicting emotions swirled in my head. Gratitude for God’s good gifts – my family, my salvation, my Granny. I closed my eyes and let the music wash over me until I felt a sharp elbow poke me. 


I frowned and turned to my husband, grumpy that he was interrupting this holy moment. Ignoring my frown, he nodded in the direction of my granny. My grandmother, who hadn’t spoken in a year, was singing the words to her favorite Christmas carol. 

“All is calm. All is bright. . . . “ 

Music touches us in in the deepest part of our hearts – and our brains. 

Have you ever gotten chills, or felt tears form in your eyes as you’ve listened to an especially beautiful piece of music? Listening to music can create peak emotions, which increase the amount of dopamine, a specific neurotransmitter that is produced in the brain and helps control the brain’s reward and pleasure centers. 

Music can evoke emotions. But emotions can also invoke music. 


One of my grandson Andrew’s favorite activities is to swing in our backyard. He loves feeling the fresh air on his face, hearing the birds in the trees, and watching the neighbor’s dogs. One day I was pushing him back and forth, and I could tell his little heart was happy. 

How did I know? He was singing. 

MAAAA Ma. DAAAA Da. MAA Ma. DAAA Da. 

The joy in his little heart just had to come out, and it came out in a song. 

Kind of like Luke. You remember him, the author of one of the four gospels? 

I’m enjoying an Advent book called Awaiting the Already, by Magrey deVega. This is what the author says about the book of Luke: 

“Luke is unique in the manner of writing he brings to the Christmas story. Mark wrote with an ominous tone. John wrote with poetic flourish. But Luke wrote with a song in his head. There’s no other way to explain why nearly every major character in Luke’s Nativity story breaks out into a song at some point. 

“Luke is a lot like a Rogers and Hammerstein musical: Something happens to someone, and they sing about it. So if Mark is like a Reader’s Digest, Matthew is like a Steven King novel, and John is like a Shakespeare play, then Luke is like a Broadway musical. 

“Every time something great happens to someone, they breaks out into song.” 

Consider Mary’s Magnificat, or Zechariah’s prophecy, or Elizabeth’s song in seclusion. Luke really loves his songs. 

And come to think of it, isn’t this true of all of us? 

I’ll be exploring the power of song and delving into three singers in the heavenly chorus of the Christmas story this Saturday, December 1, from 9:30 – 12, at New Testament Baptist Church, 300 Sims Ave., in Columbia, SC. 

Women will be gathering for Christmas Coffee, Carols, and Cards. Our morning will begin with hot cups of coffee, yummy pastries, and fellowship. I’ll share “The Songs of Christmas – Which One Are You Singing?” Then we’ll tap into our creative side as Kathy Morganelli teaches us how to make a unique, personalized Christmas card. 

The event is free, but space is limited. If you’re in the Columbia area, I’d love to see you there. RSVP by tomorrow, Tuesday, November 27 to Robin Bishop, bishopsfore@gmail.com. 

And if you don't live in the area, or can’t make it this Saturday, keep reading Hungry for God…Starving for Time. Over the next few blog posts, I’ll be sharing more about the three singers of Christmas and how their songs can become our songs this holiday season. 


Dear Hungry for God friends,

I suspect there are quite a few busy women on your Christmas list. Friends, co-workers, fellow church members, and your children's teachers, coaches, and babysitters, to name a few.

If you'd like to give them a gift that will draw them closer to the Lord, encourage them to spend time in God's Word, and think biblically, Hungry for God ... Starving for Time, Five-Minute Devotions for Busy Women is the gift you're looking for.

And what about those friends and loved ones who may not have a relationship with the Lord?

In the last devotion in the book, I share, in a winsome and non-threatening way, what it means to have a relationship with Jesus Christ.

If you give someone you care about a copy of HFG, you'll not only be passing along spiritual encouragement, you'll also be sharing the gospel. Either way, you could change someone's life forever.

And that's what Christmas is all about.




I'm excited to say that
Hungry for God . . . Starving for Time has 112 reviews and a 4.8 star rating on Amazon. It received the Christian Small Publisher Book of the Year award in 2016.

If you live in the Columbia, South Carolina area, I'd love to autograph and personalize copies for your special friends. Email me at LoriAHatcher (at) gmail.com.




  





Are you hungry for God, but starving for time? 
I’d love to send you a 5-minute e-mail devotion twice a week to start your day off with the Lord. 

Sign up for a free subscription to Hungry for God by CLICKING HERE.
Then, be sure to VALIDATE the confirmation email you receive. 

Note: I promise never to spam you or share your email address.

Because busy women need to connect with God in the craziness of everyday life.